What Is The Most Common Cause Of Syncope?

What is fainting a sign of?

Many different conditions can cause fainting.

These include heart problems such as irregular heart beats, seizures, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), anemia (a deficiency in healthy oxygen carrying cells), and problems with how the nervous system (the body’s system of nerves) regulates blood pressure..

Is it OK to sleep after fainting?

When a person faints, they suffer a brief loss of consciousness. It is recommended that you lay the person down and elevate their feet. Most people will recover quickly after fainting once they lay down because more blood can flow to your brain.

What are the 4 classifications of syncope?

Syncope is classified as neurally mediated (reflex), cardiac, orthostatic, or neurologic (Table 1).

Can syncope be cured?

There is no standard treatment that can cure all causes and types of vasovagal syncope. Treatment is individualized based on the cause of your recurrent symptoms. Some clinical trials for vasovagal syncope have yielded disappointing results. If frequent fainting is affecting your quality of life, talk to your doctor.

How do I stop syncope episodes?

How is vasovagal syncope treated?Avoiding triggers, such as standing for a long time or the sight of blood.Moderate exercise training.Discontinuing medicines that lower blood pressure, like diuretics.Eating a higher salt diet, to help keep up blood volume.Drinking plenty of fluids, to maintain blood volume.More items…

What drugs can cause syncope?

Which drugs may cause syncope?Agents that reduce blood pressure (eg, antihypertensive drugs, diuretics, nitrates)Agents that affect cardiac output (eg, beta blockers, digitalis, antiarrhythmics)Agents that prolong the QT interval (eg, tricyclic antidepressants, phenothiazines, quinidine, amiodarone)More items…•

What is the most common reason for fainting?

One of the most common reasons people faint is in reaction to an emotional trigger. For example, the sight of blood, or extreme excitement, anxiety or fear, may cause some people to faint. This condition is called vasovagal syncope.

What is syncope a symptom of?

Syncope is a temporary loss of consciousness usually related to insufficient blood flow to the brain. It’s also called fainting or “passing out.” It most often occurs when blood pressure is too low (hypotension) and the heart doesn’t pump enough oxygen to the brain.

Should I go to the ER after fainting?

…even if you think it’s just because you haven’t eaten all day. It might be nothing, but it could also signal a heart or circulation problem or even a stroke. “There’s no way to determine the cause on your own,” says emergency physician Dr.

Is syncope a disability?

Fainting, or syncope, can be serious if it continues to occur. As such, it is a condition that can qualify you for disability benefits. … As such, the Social Security Administration evaluates syncope as a condition listed under the cardiovascular system.

Is syncope an emergency?

Syncope is a common chief complaint encountered in the emergency department (ED). The causes of syncope range from benign to life threatening. Being able to rule out life threatening causes is one of the main goals of the emergency physician.

What is the number one cause of syncopal episodes?

Common causes of syncope include: low blood pressure or dilated blood vessels. irregular heart beat. abrupt changes in posture, such as standing up too quickly, which can cause blood to pool in the feet or legs.

Is syncope a sign of stroke?

Strokes or near strokes rarely can cause syncope. A particular subtype of stroke that affects the back of the brain may result in a sudden loss of stability and a fall, but consciousness is usually maintained.

What does syncope feel like?

Many times, patients feel an episode of syncope coming on. They have what are called “premonitory symptoms,” such as feeling lightheaded, nauseous, and heart palpitations (irregular heartbeats that feel like “fluttering” in the chest).

Can you drive if you have syncope?

Legal restrictions on the ability to drive for patients with a predilection to syncope vary significantly among jurisdictions, but most prohibit driving for 3-12 months. The risk of syncope while driving among patients with frequent episodes of vasovagal syncope appears to be very low in this study.